FILE - This Oct. 4, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Supreme Court at sunset in Washington. More than 200 corporations have signed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The brief, announced Tuesday, July 2, 2019 by a coalition of five LGBTQ-rights groups, is being submitted to the Supreme Court this week ahead of oral arguments before the justices this fall on three cases that may determine whether gays, lesbians and transgender people are protected from discrimination by existing federal civil rights laws. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

The Justice Department is seeking to persuade a federal employment rights agency to change their stance on LGBTQ discrimination in an upcoming Supreme Court case.
The case, involving Aimee Stephens, a transgender funeral worker from Michigan who was fired from her job after announcing her transition, will appear before the Supreme Court on October 8.
Under the Trump administration, the Justice Department reportedly wants the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to tell the US Supreme Court that businesses can discriminate against transgender employees without violating the law, sources told Bloomberg Law.
The Obama administration previously held that the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which states that employers can’t discriminate based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin, also applies to LGBTQ persons. The EEOC currently follows that Obama-era rule.
The Justice Department has until Friday to outline their reasons for the reversal before the case appears before the Supreme Court.
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The Justice Department is seeking to persuade a federal employment rights agency to change their stance on LGBTQ discrimination in an upcoming Supreme Court case, according to a Bloomberg Law report.

Under the Trump administration, the Justice Department reportedly wants the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to back them …read more


Source:: Businessinsider – Politics

      

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